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DJI Mini 2 gets upgraded with 4K video, OcuSync tech, and stronger motors

When DJI announced the Mavic Mini last year, many people were astounded by the drone’s ability to fly under the radar without Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) registration, thanks to its 249-gram weight. While it was praised for that, one of the biggest critiques from consumers was that it lacked 4K video recording — topping out instead at 2.7K recording. Well, those concerns have been addressed by its successor, the DJI Mini 2, which packs that capability and many more while continuing to be able to fly under the radar at the same light weight.

This announcement is a bit of a surprise, given that DJI rarely comes out with successive drones this quickly. Take the DJI Spark, for example, which was released in 2017 and was the lightest drone in the company’s portfolio — until the release of the Mavic Mini last year. The standout feature with the Mini 2 is 4K video recording, a useful option for those who want a bit more elbow room when editing clips in post. Not only has the resolution been increased, but the bit rate also went from 40 Mbps previously to 100 Mbps with the Mini 2. However, its frame rate at 4K peaks at 30 frames per second (FPS).

The Mini 2 also features OcuSync 2.0 transmission technology, something that was introduced with the Mavic Air 2 this past summer. Gone is the original Mini’s controller, replaced by the same controller introduced with the Mavic Air 2. It’s not as sleek or collapsible, but it improves the reliability of the connection between the drone and controller. In fact, it’s rated to deliver a maximum range of 10 kilometers — an increase of 150% versus the Mavic Mini. Having a stable video feed is crucial whenever you’re piloting a drone, so OcuSync 2.0’s superior transmission and reliability brings added peace of mind.

One common issue with lightweight drones is stability in windy conditions, a problem that some Mavic Mini owners have experienced. DJI has apparently tweaked the motors for better acceleration and speed, allowing the Mini 2 to withstand winds up to 24 mph. Even though we’re told its top speed remains the same at about 29 mph, DJI has somehow managed to bump up its fly time to 31 minutes — a minute more than the Mavic Mini. All of this should alleviate any concerns pilots may have about flying a drome that’s so light.

Beyond those three main standouts, the DJI Mini 2 features a few similar shooting modes found in other DJI drones. Those familiar with cinematic sweeps such as Rocket, Boomerang, and Helix will love that the same autonomous actions are present on the Mini 2. However, the collision-detection sensors found in DJI’s higher-end drone, the Mavic Air 2, are absent here. There are also no dedicated slow-motion modes, but if you step down the resolution to 1080p, it can go up to 60 FPS.

As for pricing, DJI makes the Mini 2 hard to resist at $450. You can buy it starting today through DJI’s online store, as well as from select retail partners. It’s a $50 increase over the existing Mavic Mini, which is justifiable given all the upgrades. If that’s not enough to sink your teeth into, the Fly More Combo for the DJI Mini 2 goes for $600 and packages in three batteries, a charging hub, a better carrying case, and a propeller strap. If you’ve been waiting until now to enter the drone fray, now’s the time because the DJI Mini 2 is the ideal starter drone.

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Source
DigitalTrends

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